Placeholder for LessonBanner

Syllabus

Quick Links

Course Materials
Assignments
Exams
Grading

Prerequisites:

Welcome to Music 076 (level 6), part of the MUSIC certificate suite of organ courses offered by the Brigham Young University School of Music through BYU Independent Study. Organ Performance, level 6 is the capstone organ course designed to provide direction, and instruction for organists to improve their skills in specific areas: organ technique, organ repertoire, hymn playing, accompaniment, music theory, organ registration, sight-reading, and transposition. This is accomplished by providing materials, assignments, testing, and feedback in each area. Levels 1–6 focus on the skills needed for the “Colleague and Service Playing” certificates offered by the American Guild of Organists.

Course Outcomes

Are You Enrolled in the Appropriate Level?

Make sure that you are enrolled in the level that is right for you.

Level 1 offers beginning organ instruction—for pianists with little or no previous formal organ training, or who need help in applying what they have learned in their organ playing. It is also very helpful to those who have played the organ for years but wish to “fill holes” in their organ training. Level 1 covers basic organ technique, early-level repertoire, basic organ registration, and sight-reading single-line melodies. It also begins developing organ accompaniment and transposition skills. Music theory topics covered in level 1 include the overtone series, musical notation (including note names, clefs, ottava sign, accidentals, enharmonic notes, chromatic scale, whole and half steps) rhythmic concepts (including duple, triple, and quadruple meter; simple and compound time), note values and rest values, metronome indications, tempo indications, and time signatures.

Level 2 reviews the basics taught in level 1 and deepens them significantly. Level 2 is designed for those with organ training, but who would benefit from a review of basic legato organ technique, repertoire, hymn playing, and registration. Because level 2 develops the ability to sight-read two-part music, students should already be able to sight–read single line melodies. Music theory topics covered in level 2 include harmonic and melodic intervals, numerical classification of intervals, compound intervals, classification of intervals by quality, inversion of intervals, enharmonic intervals, structure of the basic scales, modes, the keynote, structure of the major scale, use of accidentals to form major scales on any note, the minor scales (natural, harmonic, and melodic), diatonic and chromatic intervals, key and tonality, major key signatures, relative keys, minor key signatures, use of accidentals to form the various minor scales, the circle of fifths, enharmonic keys, parallel keys, the tertian system, triads (basic, major, minor, diminished, augmented), and triads generated by major and minor scales.

Level 3 assumes fluency in the techniques taught in levels 1 and 2, and introduces the performance of early music. Because level 3 develops the ability to sight-read easy three-part music and hymns, students should already be able to sight-read two-part music. Music theory topics covered in level 3 include

Level 4 assumes fluency in the techniques taught in levels 1–3, including an introduction to the performance of early music. Level 4 students should have training in organ pieces in both legato and articulate styles. They should also be able to play easy four-part vocal scores, to sight-read simple three- and four-part organ music and hymns, and to transpose hymn melodies (only) up to and including a major second up and down. Music theory topics covered in level 4 include

Level 5 is early advanced—for those with substantial training and fluency in legato organ technique, repertoire, registration, hymn playing, registration, and in intermediate organ pieces in both legato and articulate styles. Should be able to play moderately difficult four-part vocal scores and easy choir accompaniments, to sight-read moderately difficult four-part organ music and hymns, and to transpose simple hymns into all keys up to and including a major second up and down. Level 5 students should feel comfortable with the playing skills and understand the music theory topics covered in levels 1, 2, 3, and 4 (see below). Music theory topics covered in level 5 include:

While it is possible to “catch up” during this course on a few concepts or skills that you may have missed from earlier levels, avoid enrolling in a course that may be too difficult to complete in time. If you feel that you have enrolled at the wrong level, contact Independent Study to request a change of course. If you are unsure, contact your BYU faculty organ course instructor.

Course Materials

The following resources are required in Level 6:

  1. Cook, Don. The OrganTutor Workbook, Spanish Fork, UT: Ard Publications, 2008; or OrganTutor Organ 101 Complete. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University, 1998/2008. For those with computers, OrganTutor Organ 101 Complete (which includes both the workbook and computer tutorial).
  2. Ritchie, George, and George Stauffer. Organ Technique: Modern and Early. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.
  3. Steinke, Greg A. and Paul O. Harder. Harmonic Materials in Tonal Music, Part II. 10th edition. NJ: Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010. Eighth or ninth edition also acceptable.

Student’s choice of one of the following, with course instructor and private organ instructor approval:

  1. Hanon: The Virtuoso Pianist (complete, any edition, including free online resources)
  2. 1 or 2 pedal solo pieces
  3. German Baroque pieces
  4. Romantic period pieces
  5. Contemporary pieces
  6. A hymnbook
  7. AGO Hymn Booklet (free online)
  8. Four-part vocal scores
  9. Organ accompaniments for choir
  10. An organ accompaniment for vocal solo
  11. A piano accompaniment for choir, to be adapted for the organ
  12. Timeline of the Organ: 2600 Years of History (Available only through Organ Historical Society for about $3.50) (also used in levels 3–5)
  13. Sight-reading hymns and organ pieces
  14. AGO Service Playing Sight-Reading Examples from past tests (available from AGO Educational Resources)
  15. An improvisation method (to be determined together by student and instructor)
  16. Hymns and easy organ pieces for transposition

Lessons as needed with a qualified organ instructor (at least two lessons for each of the three played assignments), who may also be approved to serve as the evaluator for the played assignments. Make arrangements to meet with your teacher as often as needed to complete the course in time. Although some can complete the course with only occasional contact with a teacher, most students do their best work when lessons are frequent and regular (that is, weekly or biweekly). You are responsible to pay the fee required by your chosen teacher.

Arrange for a qualified evaluator to pass off the three Played Assignments. “A qualified evaluator” is an organist with formal training in the fundamentals of classical organ technique. Formal training means regular and ongoing organ (not piano) lessons or classes with a qualified organ (not piano) teacher. Even though an organist may have had years of experience playing the organ, without at least several months of serious organ training he or she will not be able to evaluate your playing properly. At least two weeks prior to your appointment, submit to your course instructor the name, mailing address, email address, phone number, and a brief description of your proposed evaluator’s organ training, and if approved, he or she will be included on an Internet list of qualified evaluators. Your instructor may also serve as your evaluator if he/she has been approved. You are responsible to pay the fee required by your evaluator.

Should you need organ shoes, you can order them here, or acquire a pair of shoes that meets the standards. You will also need regular (daily) access to a standard church/classical organ (pipe or electronic)

BYU Organ Faculty Resources

In addition to the materials you will receive from BYU Independent Study for this level, other resources are available on the BYU Organ Study home page. Make use of this Internet resource as you continue organ study. This website will be updated frequently with new and interesting organ related resources, some of which are designed specifically for BYU Independent Study organ students.

Don Cook, your BYU organ faculty course instructor, can answer most of your questions dealing with the subject matter of this course. Feel free to contact him at 801-422-3260 or by email at don_cook@byu.edu.

(Back to top)

Assignments

This course consists of three units and three played assignments. Each unit contains between three and seven lessons and an exam. Unit 1 also contains two Speedback Assignments. Each lesson contains a reading assignment, usually based on a section from one of the textbooks. Study guides for each lesson (and the Speedback Assignments in Unit 1) will help deepen your learning of the material and prepare you for the exam at the end of each unit.

Begin the course by working on Unit 1, Lesson 1: “History and Development of the Organ.” Follow the study guide closely, taking careful notes. Complete the first Speedback Assignment after Lesson 1. After you have completed all of the lessons in the unit, review your study guides. When you feel that you are ready, complete the second Speedback Assignment. Use the detailed feedback that you will receive as you review the topics that you missed.

While you work through lesson 1, also begin working on Played Assignment 1. Throughout the course, practice the played assignments alongside your work on the three units, arranging for lessons with your local organ instructor as often as needed. Whenever you are ready, arrange with the approved evaluator to pass off the entire played assignment, or send a video recording to your BYU Independent Study course instructor. If qualified, your instructor may also serve as the evaluator. He or she may mark the Played Assignment Evaluation Forms as you complete each requirement, sending them in to the BYU course instructor when they are completed.

(Back to top)

Assessment Plan

  1. Two Speedback Assignments designed as review exercises for the Unit 1 Exam (4% of the course grade), The Lesson 1 Speedback Assignment (20 questions consisting of 78 multiple-choice questions (4% of the course grade)
  2. Three Played Assignments (Unit 1 worth 15%, Unit 2 worth 15% and Unit 3 worth 20% for a total of 50% of your grade)
  3. Final Exam, 50 multiple-choice questions (42%)

(Back to top)

Grading

As in the previous levels, the course includes study lessons and played assignments. Students work through the course independently and with the help of their local organ instructor. Played assignments, prepared concurrently with the study lessons, are assessed through three played assignments passed off to an evaluator approved by the course instructor.

A 94–100
A- 91–93
B+ 88–90
B 86–87
B- 84-85
C+ 81–83
C 79–80
C- 77–78
D+ 74–76
D 72–73
D- 70–71
E 0–69
Assignment/Exam Percentage of Grade
Lesson 1 Speedback Assignment 4%
Unit 1 Speedback Assignment 4%
Played Assignment 1 15%
Played Assignment 2 15%
Played Assignment 3 20%
Final Exam 42%

Course Structure

Unit 1—Organ Registration Fundamentals (review)

Unit 2—Music Theory: Harmonic Materials Part II

Unit 3—Music Theory: Harmonic Materials Part II

Each played assignment includes unique requirements in repertoire, hymn playing, accompaniment, sight-reading, and transposition. Authoring these includes selecting and organizing the requirements and writing the evaluation forms—approximately 24 hours total.

(Back to top)

Course Duration

Students have 12 months from the date and time of registration to complete this course. One extension is allowed for a fee.

(Back to top)

Getting Help

Please use the help menu in this course to contact Independent Study or your instructor. You can find a list of free tutors available to BYU Independent Study students on the Free Tutoring Services website.

(Back to top)

Inappropriate Use of Course Content

All course materials (outlines, handouts, syllabi, exams, quizzes, media, lecture content, audio and video recordings, and so forth) are proprietary. Students are prohibited from posting or selling any such course materials without the express written permission of BYU Independent Study. To do so is a violation of the Brigham Young University Honor Code.

  

Course Policies

These policies are specific to this course. For additional information about general policies, please refer to Independent Study Course Policies page.

Assignments

Two computer-graded assignments, and three instructor-graded assignments. No resubmissions allowed. Must pass with a 70% on all assignments to pass the level.

Exams

1 proctored, multiple-choice, computer-graded final exam. No retakes are allowed. All assignments must be submitted and graded before requesting the Final Exam. Students must pass all the exams with 70% to pass the course.

Getting Help

Please use the help menu in this course to contact Independent Study or your instructor. You can find a list of free tutors available to BYU Independent Study students on the Free Tutoring Services website.

Note: The Harold B. Lee Library website provides a number of online resources and librarians are available via phone, chat, and email to answer questions about library-related issues.

Inappropriate Use of Course Content

All course materials (e.g., outlines, handouts, syllabi, exams, quizzes, media, lecture content, audio and video recordings, etc.) are proprietary. Students are prohibited from posting or selling any such course materials without the express written permission of BYU Independent Study. To do so is a violation of the Brigham Young University Honor Code.

Copyright © 2016 Brigham Young University. All rights reserved.

Published by the
Department of Independent Study
Division of Continuing Education
Brigham Young University
120 MORC
Provo, Utah 84602-1514
USA