Syllabus

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Introduction to the Course
Course Materials
Department Learning Outcomes
Learning Expectations
Manifesto for IHUM 240
Assignments
Exams
Grading

Introduction to the Course

Welcome to Interdisciplinary Humanities (IHUM) 240—a multimedia approach to the humanities of India, China, and Japan.

India, China, and Japan have become three of the most influential global powers today, and yet they have also profoundly influenced civilizations throughout the world for millennia. The emphasis in this course is on exposing you to the following: 1) some of the basic philosophical and religious ideas that have shaped each culture, and 2) some of the important works of art, literature, drama, and music produced by those three cultures. We will begin the study of each unit by looking at the earliest and most durable examples of material culture—metal and stone artifacts and architectural remnants. We will look at examples of printed literature and paintings as they became historically available, and we will end the study of each unit by looking at the most ephemeral member of the humanities—the performing arts. The course will dwell on some subjects over others because of the accessibility of historical materials and the availability of scholarly research in English.

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Course Materials

The following textbooks will be used for this course:

  1. La Plante, John D.  Asian Art, 3rd edition. Boston: McGraw Hill, 1992. 13: 978-0697115911
  2. Yohannan, John D. A Treasury of Asian Literature. New York: Meridian, 1994. 13: 9780452011489
  3. Lawson, Francesca. The Humanities of Asia: An Introduction. Humanities 240. BYU Academic Publishing, 2008.  

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Department Learning Outcomes

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Learning Expectations

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Manifesto for IHum 240

What it is

  1. IHum 240 introduces the traditional arts of three of the most important cultures in the current global economy: India, China, and Japan. A study of the arts provides a unique window into the souls of these people and invites the student to gain wisdom and sensitivity for future inter-cultural contacts.
  2. IHum 240 is fast paced. Consider this: IHum 201 and 202 (Western European Humanities), offered as two separate classes, covers approximately 1200 years over the course of two semesters. Hum 240, offered as a single course, covers approximately 12,000 years of history (when considering all three cultural units combined). Since we have about ten times as much material to cover in half the time, we encounter two problems: 1) we inevitably have to pare down the material drastically and 2) we must move forward at a rapid pace to cover even the abbreviated material. Please recognize that this means that we cannot dwell long on any one time period.
  3. IHum 240 stresses critical thinking and cultural literacy equally. In the course, we learn about the distinctions between orality and literacy, cultural assimilation processes, issues in foreign domination, the rise and fall of Buddhism in each culture, the arts as a corrective, the performance of hidden transcripts, and the importance of aural skills—all of which will help students to learn and think critically. However, these concepts are not taught in a vacuum; rather, we study historical and cultural detail to provide plenty of examples to explain the concepts we cover in class. Learning that cultural detail is an essential part of learning to think critically. Students are expected to review the material regularly in order to assimilate the information for the 3 exams (one each for India, China, and Japan) and to prepare to engage in serious critical inquiry for the cumulative review paper and the event research paper.

What IHum 240 is not

  1. IHum 240 focuses more on cultural events than on historical developments, although we do progress through our study of Asian humanities chronologically. The history department offers excellent courses on different periods of Japanese and Chinese history. Please check their offerings.
  2. If you are interested in modern popular culture, IHum 240 is probably not the class for you. This class focuses instead on the philosophical and religious foundations for the traditional arts of India, China, and Japan. Please check offerings in the departments of Anthropology and Asian and Near Eastern Languages for courses in the contemporary arts of India, China, and Japan.

Multimedia Access

Hummedia multimedia access—a number of videos in this course need to be accessed via the Hummedia service that BYU provides free of charge to BYU students. To find the video you need to watch, look up the name provided next to the Hummdeia link in the content. The login information is:

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Assignments

You will complete computer-graded quizzes, write and respond to discussion posts, and submit two written assignments.

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Exams

There are three proctored exams for this course. They are not comprehensive, but each exam contains 200 multiple choice questions. To study for the exams, review your textbooks, look over and review the main sections of the online text, self-checks, and videos.

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Grading

Grades will be based on the following:

Assignment Percent
6 Quizzes 5%
Discussion Posts 5%
Event Report Research Paper 15%
Cumulative Research Paper 30%
3 Exams 45% (15% each)
Total 100

Your letter grade is calculated based on this scale:

Grading Scale
A 100–94
A− 93–90
B+ 89–87
B 86–83
B− 82–80
C+ 79–77
C 76–73
C− 72–70
D+ 69–67
D 66–63
D− 62–60
E (fail) 59–0

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Copyright Notice

The materials used in connection with this online course are only for the use of students enrolled in this course for purposes associated with this course and may not be retained or further disseminated. Any copying or further dissemination of these materials may be subject to applicable U.S. Copyright Laws. For questions or more information, please visit the BYU Copyright Licensing Office website.

“Members of the BYU community who willfully disregard this Copyright Policy or the BYU Copyright Guidelines place themselves individually at risk of legal action and may incur personal liability for their conduct. The unauthorized use or distribution of copyrighted material, including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing, may subject individuals to civil and criminal liabilities, including actual and statutory damages, costs and fees of litigation, fines, and imprisonment

Violations of the Copyright Policy may result in university disciplinary action including termination of university enrollment or employment.” (Emphasis added. Excerpt taken from the BYU Copyright Policy)

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University Policy - Title IX Statement

Preventing & Responding to Sexual Misconduct

In accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Brigham Young University prohibits unlawful sex discrimination against any participant in its education programs or activities. The university also prohibits sexual harassment—including sexual violence—committed by or against students, university employees, and visitors to campus. As outlined in university policy, sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking are considered forms of "Sexual Misconduct" prohibited by the university.

University policy requires all university employees in a teaching, managerial, or supervisory role to report all incidents of Sexual Misconduct that come to their attention in any way, including but not limited to face-to-face conversations, a written class assignment or paper, class discussion, email, text, or social media post. Incidents of Sexual Misconduct should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator at t9coordinator@byu.edu or (801) 422-8692. Reports may also be submitted through EthicsPoint at https://titleix.byu.edu/report or 1-888-238-1062 (24-hours a day).

BYU offers confidential resources for those affected by Sexual Misconduct, including the university’s Victim Advocate, as well as a number of non-confidential resources and services that may be helpful. Additional information about Title IX, the university’s Sexual Misconduct Policy, reporting requirements, and resources can be found at http://titleix.byu.edu or by contacting the university’s Title IX Coordinator.

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Accessibility Notice

BYU is committed to providing a working and learning atmosphere which reasonably accommodates persons with disabilities who are otherwise qualified to participate in BYU's programs and activities. In this spirit, BYU Independent Study aspires to improve web accessibility for users. While not required by law, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 Levels A and AA provide a wide range of helpful recommendations to make Web content more accessible. BYU Independent Study strives to apply WCAG 2.0 recommendations where feasible, but may deviate from any recommendations that would result in an undue hardship to BYU Independent Study or alterations to program and course content and objectives. If you have questions about accessibility, or if you need to report problems with any accessibility features please see our Accessibilities and Accommodations Web Page.

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